Shipping Container Homes Part Two

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Yes, it’s another post on homes built from shipping containers, or “cargotechture” {a new term I came across while putting together these posts.}  My last post got rather long so I wrapped it up without including this amazing home in Brisbane, Queensland Australia and the home really is worth checking out.

It was built by Todd Miller of ZieglerBuild for his family and is constructed of 31 {yes, THIRTY ONE} containers.  Miller actually used cereal boxes that approximated the size of a container to calculate how many containers he would need to construct his dream home.  That’s a LOT of cereal to eat.  The 8,000 sq ft home is three stories high and has four bedrooms and four bathrooms.  The entire 3rd floor is dedicated to the master suite {hello walk in closets!}  

The home took five months to build -- a drop in the bucket compared to how long it can take for traditionally constructed homes to be built.

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via architecturendesign.net

I'm not a huge fan of the graffiti, but to each his own.

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All the doors in the house were designed by Miller himself.  I love the front door constructed of wood end-cuts.

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The home includes a saltwater pool too -- have you ever taken a swim in one?  They are so buoyant!  I'm also a big fan of the light fixtures and the shadows they throw up on the wood plank overhang.

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Miller used steel beams that were much larger than required to maintain the industrial look of the home, but also employed materials, like the bamboo flooring, to soften the look a bit.  {I'm not feeling the furniture in the living area, but the architecture of the room is amazing!}

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via architecturendesign.net

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Miller used panels of perforated Tasmanian oak to provide warmth to the interior.  The same material was used on the custom doors.

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Another view of the Tasmanian oak panels as well as a closeup of the end-cut design seen on the front door.

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I like the pattern the plank ceiling interspersed with the steel of the containers make.  If you look closely, you can see that the spaces accessed via this hallway are closed off by the original container doors.

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Here's another view of the actual container doors that Miller kept in place for the rooms off of this hallway. {Look at the floorplan below to see what they access!}

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The stairs that accesses the master suite.  I like the use of the louvered windows on the interior to let in more light.

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Again, not the biggest fan of the decor, but the bones of the room are incredible.

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However, I am a HUGE fan of this master bath.  I wonder if the tile mural is Bisazza? {Click here to see my post on the amazing italian mosaic tile manufacturer.}

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The home's floor plan.

Here is a video of an interview with Miller if you are interested in more details about the construction of the home ::


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